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Free the Feed.
31st March 2017

The GOOD List #12

From music and modernism to motherhood and mammaries, it’s team Zetteler’s favourite stories from the week. 

Jodi’s GOOD news:

This week Jodi loved reading a thought-provoking feature by Eva Wiseman which discusses Turner Prize winning artist Rachel Whiteread’s move from Shoreditch to Camden and everything it represents. Whiteread has a permanent installation now in the V&A Museum of Childhood and an upcoming survey at Tate. | Read the feature on the Guardian website.

Rachel Whiteread at the V&A Museum of Childhood. Photographed by Phil Fisk for the Observer
Dorothy’s GOOD news:

Dorothy found herself in a strange corner of journalism when reading Rupert Hawksley’s piece on the Holy Trinity Church in Dalston — also known as the Clowns’ Church. Inside the church photographer Luke Stephenson stumbled across the world’s maddest, most charming piece of bureaucracy – the Clown Egg Register. | Read on with the Telegraph.

Bippo (1989-) from the collection held by Clowns International.
Jess’ GOOD news:

A new mother of twins and friend of Jess’ shared some shocking figures on breastfeeding recently; the UK has the lowest rate of breastfeeding in the world. 63% of women are embarrassed feeding in front of strangers, 59% are embarrassed feeding in front of their partners family and 49% are embarrassed in front of their own siblings and wider family members. Unsurprisingly Jess was thrilled to see creative agency Mother London whack a great big breast on a rooftop in Shoreditch as part of a campaign called #freethefeed which encourages women to feel more supported to breastfeed in public. | See it on Ad Week.
Free the Feed.
Katie’s GOOD news:

This week Katie spotted an interesting news story about Kristopher Ho’s hand-drawn billboard installation on Shaftesbury Avenue. It will be drawn with Air-Ink, an ink made from particles of black soot captured from car exhausts and chimneys. Air-Ink is an invention of Anirudh Sharma, formerly of MIT Media Lab, and his company Graviky Labs. | Read the full story here.

Kristopher Ho drawing with Air-Ink.
Sabine’s GOOD news:

Citing Arundhati Roy as her new inspiration, Sabine enjoyed getting to know the personally fascinating side of the renowned writer and essayist during her appearance on Desert Island Discs. Taking an 11.15pm Monday-night-walk-home detour just to finish listening, Sabine was enchanted by Roy’s ability to intertwine the absolute brutality and incredible beauty of life with such articulate fluidity. | Have a listen here.

Arundhati Roy at home in New Delhi. Photographed by Chiara Goia for The New York Times
Amy’s GOOD news:

Novelty Automation near Holborn is a collection of bizarre and amazing satirical arcade machines invented and expertly built by Tim Hunkin. They include the 'Small Hadron Collider', 'Instant Eclipse' and 'Is it Art?', but Amy's favourite is 'AutoFrisk - Stand in position and let the rubber gloves give you a thorough frisk'. It's open late every Thursday and with a bar every first Thursday of the month. | More information here.

Novelty Automation website.
Milly’s GOOD news:

Japanese architecture has been a profound, but often understated, influence on design concepts and approaches around the world. A new Barbican exhibition, The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945, celebrates the country’s distinctive and experimental domestic architecture. | Read all about it with Creative Review.

Terunobu Fujimori’s teahouse at The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945. Photographed by Miles Willis / Getty Images
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